Boomerang in Dublin

Lenina was laughing at me when I mentioned that I was going to find a place in Dublin for throwing a boomerang. Somehow, there’s a perfect place just on my way to work! Every morning, if the wind is not too strong, I just can’t resist taking my boomerang out from my bag and giving it few rounds over the sports ground.

Too bad my photo camera (Canon G3) makes only 15 frames per second. I have also found out that those 15 frames are not distributed evenly; if you take a closer look the cars in the beginning, you will notice that they repeatedly “accelerate” and “decelerate”.

I’m thinking about buying three more boomerangs:

  1. A boomerang for kids, light and easy to throw, for warm-ups and for my GF. My current boom requires very strong throws.
  2. Aerobie Orbiter is sensitive to throwing technique. What’s unique about it is that it can be tuned! (You know, those Linux geeks, they just have to customize everything…)
  3. A long-range boomerang, such as Space Ranger or perhaps Challenger II.

The note at the bottom of Challenger’s page warns about the alternative, expert throwing technique that this boomerang requires. I wonder what that might be. Since I don’t know anybody who knows how to throw a boomerang, I’ll have to find out by trial and error.

VAIO Recovery Disc vs Linux

I have bought a gorgeous Sony VAIO N11S laptop. Exactly the same model as Lenina did.

Sony VAIO VGN-N11S

My VAIO came with preinstalled Windows XP Media Center, together with a couple of applications which I didn’t bother to check out. What I wanted to do is to install Linux on it.

Linux needs space on the HDD, so I needed to make some. I don’t trust partition resizing, so I wanted to clean the hard disk, repartition it and install everything from scratch. The preinstalled Windows needed to be removed.

I knew that I would sooner or later need Windows for my work, so I looked into the laptop box looking for Windows installation CDs, just like with my previous laptop, Amilo Pro V2000D. Surprise: no Windows installation CDs. Instead, there was a pop-up telling me to burn recovery DVD discs. I didn’t have any blank DVDs (must remember: buy DVDs together with the laptop next time!), so I couldn’t install Linux the first night. I bought DVDs, burned the recovery discs and proceeded with Ubuntu Linux installation.

Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft) installed smoothly. I was using it for a week, and during the weekend, I decided to try install Windows on the first partition, to have a dual-boot laptop.

I booted the recovery DVD and learned that I can, indeed, recover my VAIO to the state it had on delivery, i.e. with a single operating system on it: Windows.

On other words, they just wouldn’t let me install Windows on one partition. If there is no Windows on the laptop, the recovery disc will always wipe the entire HDD. The only thing a user can do is set the sizes of two partitions (system and data).

I think I will still be able to make it dual-boot, but it will require much more effort: Backup my current Linux installation, install Windows, repartition the disk (leaving Windows) and finally restore Linux.